Episode 74. May 24, 2021: The Principles of Government, The Declaration of Citizen Rights, and the Constitution of the Democratic Republic of America

Podbean audio introduction to Episode 74

Video introduction of Episode 74 on Rumble

CLP News Network Episode 74. May 24, 2021

The Principles of Government, The Declaration of Citizen Rights, and the Constitution of the Democratic Republic of America

Introduction:

I am Laurie Thomas Vass, and this podcast is the introduction to a copyrighted production of the CLP News Network, for May 24, 2021.

Our podcast is titled, The Principles of Government, The Declaration of Citizen Rights, and the Constitution of the Democratic Republic of America.

We wrote this document to provide natural rights conservatives with a first draft of our thoughts about the new government. We consider our contribution as a first step in developing an ideology of individual liberty that vanquishes the ideology of Marxist collectivism.

Our ideology of natural rights is based upon the philosophical lineage of Locke-Jefferson-Lincoln, which we are fighting to conserve.

We begin with a confession. We believe that the Former United States of America (FUSA) ended early on the morning of November 4, 2020, when the vote counting stopped, to allow truck loads of fraudulent ballots to be counted.

We believe that the Former United States of America was overthrown by a Marxist coup that installed an unelected, illegitimate tyrant as a fake President.

Democrat Party Marxism is a permanent feature of the American political system, and nothing of institutional or cultural value will be left to restore, even if election integrity is restored.

We advocate the creation of a new nation called the Democratic Republic of America, based upon the state sovereignty framework of the original 13 states, codified in The Articles of Confederation.

The Constitution of the new nation replaces the flawed document of Madison’s representative republic with a democratic republic, which grants more power to citizens to protect their liberty from tyrants.

We believe that we are in a similar historical circumstance to the patriots who wrote, “The Declaration of The Causes and Necessity of Taking Up Arms,” on July 6, 1775, one year before the adoption of the Declaration of Independence of 1776.

For the benefit of education for Black Marxist professors at UNC, who claim that America was founded in 1619, we cite this document of 1775 as the original founding document of America.

The new nation was not founded to preserve slavery, it was founded to champion the cause of liberty.

The Declaration of 1775 states,

“We are reduced to the alternative of choosing an unconditional submission to the tyranny of irritated Ministers, or resistance by force. The latter is our choice. We have counted the cost of this contest, and find nothing so dreadful as voluntary slavery. Honor, justice, and humanity, forbid us, tamely to surrender that freedom which we received from our gallant ancestors, and which our innocent posterity have a right to receive from us.”

The Patriots began their Declaration, of 1775, in the same place that we find ourselves today: on the fundamental purpose of government.

The Patriots wrote,

“Our forefathers, inhabitants of the Island of Great Britain, left their native           land, to seek on these shores a residence for civil and religious           freedom…Government was instituted to promote the welfare of           mankind, and ought to be administered for the attainment of that end.”

We believe that the differences in ideology between natural rights and Marxism are irreconcilable and unsolvable.

We believe that the only peaceful, non-violent solution to the differences is a civil disunion of the Former United States of America, where citizens in each state can vote to join the new nation, or to remain in a Marxist tyranny.

We have written a small book, titled “The Natural Rights Conservatism of Rush Limbaugh,” that places Rush’s philosophy into the framework of a natural rights ideology, so that conservatives will have a better understanding of the ideology of liberty that we are fighting for. The book is available at Gabby Press, for $22.00.

We have created a discussion forum for natural rights conservatives to contribute their ideas about the new constitution and to discuss with other conservatives the best path forward.

Citizens Liberty News Network.com https://urlb.us/p3Y3oOmw

This podcast is the introduction to a much longer written document, available for free for one week, at clpnewsnetwork.com

The other sections in the longer article are:

Section 1. America’s First Founding Document: The Declaration of The Causes and Necessity of Taking Up Arms.

Section 2. The Declaration of Independence: America’s Second Founding Document.

Section 3. The Articles of Confederation: America’s Third Founding Document.

Section 4. The Principles of Government of the Democratic Republic of America.

Section 5. The Declaration of Citizen Rights of the Democratic Republic of America.

Section 6. The Constitution of the Democratic Republic of America.

Conclusion: Ratification and Implementation.

A yearly subscription to all CLP News Network podcasts is $30, which enables you to join our discussion group for natural rights conservatives.

A single copy of this article in eBook form is available at Books2Read for $5.50.

I am Laurie Thomas Vass, and this podcast is a copyrighted production of the CLP News Network.

Section 1. America’s First Founding Document: The Declaration of The Causes and Necessity of Taking Up Arms:.

On July 6, 1775, the Continental Congress approved the Declaration of the Causes and Necessity of Taking up Arms. The Patriot’s logic and circumstances of tyranny, then, are the same as the Trump voters, today, who are called domestic terrorists by the Marxist tyrants.

Back then, the King said that all the Patriots,

“All of them, either by name or description, are rebels and traitors.”

Natural rights conservatives, today, face the same choice between freedom and slavery, as the Patriots in 1775.

As they wrote,

“We are reduced to the alternative of choosing an unconditional submission to the tyranny of irritated Ministers, or resistance by force. The latter is our choice. We have counted the cost of this contest, and find nothing so dreadful as voluntary slavery. Honor, justice, and humanity, forbid us, tamely to surrender that freedom which we received from our gallant ancestors, and which our innocent posterity have a right to receive from us.”

In their Declaration, the Patriots resolved,

“to die Freemen rather than live as Slaves.”

Like the deplorable Trump voters, today, the Patriots, then, were attacked, by unprovoked enemies of freedom, for the same reasons as the Marxists attack Trump voters, today.

The Patriots wrote,

“We fight not for glory or for conquest. We exhibit to mankind the remarkable spectacle of a people attacked by unprovoked enemies, without any imputation or even suspicion of offence. They boast of their privileges and civilization, and yet proffer no milder conditions than servitude or death.”

Like the Marxist tyrants, today, the tyrants in 1775 attempted to take the Patriot’s guns from them, so that the Patriots were left defenseless against the British army.

Then, the first effort at gun control began with a benevolent promise, by the King’s magistrates, that the guns would be returned to the Patriots, after the riots ended.

They wrote,

“[They were instructed to] deposit their arms with their own Magistrates, The Patriots accordingly delivered up their arms; but [the King] in open violation of honor, in defiance of the obligation of treaties, which even savage nations esteemed sacred, the Governor ordered the guns turned over to the King.”

The logic of the Patriots, in taking up arms, is that the King had fundamentally altered the form of Government, like today, when the Marxists usurped power in their successful coup, and fundamentally altered the written Constitution of natural rights, with an unwritten constitution of communism.

The Patriots wrote,

“[The King] altered fundamentally the form of Government established by Charter, and secured by acts of its own Legislature, solemnly confirmed by the Crown; for exempting the “murderers” of Colonists from legal trial, and, in effect, from punishment; for erecting a despotism dangerous to our very existence;”

The Patriots objected to the two-track justice system that allowed agents of the Crown to murder Patriots, without consequence. Just as today, when Marxists escape the fundamental concept of natural law that all citizens are subject to the same law.

The Patriots began their Declaration, of 1775, in the same place that we begin ours today: on the fundamental purpose of government.

The Patriots wrote,

“Our forefathers, inhabitants of the Island of Great Britain, left their native land, to seek on these shores a residence for civil and religious freedom…Government was instituted to promote the welfare of mankind, and ought to be administered for the attainment of that end.”

We cite the The Declaration of The Causes and Necessity of Taking Up Arms, as the historical moral authority for our proposed Constitution of the Democratic Republic of America.

Section 2. The Declaration of Independence: America’s Second Founding Document.

The moral justification of the first American Revolution was the belief that the British authorities intended to enslave the colonists.

As early as 1765, John Adams raised the alarm in his ‘Dissertation on the Feudal Law,” in response to the Stamp Art. (C. Bradley Thompson, America’s Revolutionary Mind).

Adams wrote,

“Nothing less than this seems to have been meditated for us, by somebody in Great Britain. There seems to be direct and formal design on foot, to enslave all America.”‘

In 1767, in response to the Townshend Acts, John Dickinson of Pennsylvania pursued the revolutionary logic in his Letters from a Farmer in Pennsylvania.

He wrote,

“Some person may think this act of no consequence, because the duties are so small. A fatal error. That is the very circumstance most alarming to me. For I am convinced, that the authors of this law would never have obtained an act to raise so trifling a sum…. In short, if they have a right to levy a tax of one penny upon us, then they have a right to levy a million upon us.”

Jefferson wrote in 1774,

“Single acts of tyranny may be ascribed to the accidental opinion of a day, but a series of oppressions begun at a distinguished period, and pursued, unalterably through every change of ministers, too plainly prove a deliberate and systematical plan of reducing us to slavery.”

Patrick Henry wrote,

“There is no retreat but in submission and slavery! Our chains are forged! Their clanking may be heard on the plains of Boston! The war is inevitable — and let it come! I repeat it, sir, let it come… Is life so dear, or peace so sweet, as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery? Forbid it, Almighty God! I know not what course others may take; but as for me, give me liberty or give me death!”

We begin our argument for the moral justification of a second American revolution that Marxism is a form of slavery where common citizens become slaves of the Marxist government.

“No one is born into moral subjugation to political power,” stated Jefferson.

Jefferson wrote that when citizens leave the state of nature to create their government, “all men are created equal… in nature all humans are equal…not subject to the rightful authority of any other human being…in a state of nature no rightful authority exists in nature. No man is subjected to the will or authority of any other man,” he wrote, over and over again, from 1776, to the very last letter he wrote in 1826.

Jefferson believed that individuals are rights-possessors, with equal inalienable rights to pursue their own happiness, manage their private lives, and be free of government coercion in their person and their property.

Jefferson’s natural rights principles were:

  • Equality among citizens to participate in government.
  • Privacy of citizens from the invasions of agents of government.
  • The right to vote in free and fair elections.
  • The protection of the natural and property rights of individuals as the supreme goal of government.
  • Equal access to the courts and equality before the law.

Jefferson wrote the Declaration as a compact between citizens in each state to establish a rightful centralized political power, dedicated to protecting the natural rights of citizens that are left incompletely protected within each state government.

When the citizens leave the state of nature, the fundamental justification of government, according to Locke, is to protect those natural rights with the rule of law.

In the concept of the natural rights republic, Jefferson (1782), thought it was ridiculous to suppose that a man should surrender himself to the state.

“This would be slavery….Freedom would be destroyed by the establishment of the opinion that the state has a perpetual right to the services of all its members.”

Jefferson wrote,

“We come to respect those rights in others that we value in ourselves.”

In Marxism, the welfare of the nation is determined from a collectivist, social class perspective, where  those on the top make decisions on behalf of those on the bottom.

Jefferson relied on Locke to express his phrase “deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed.”

In other words, “consent of the governed” appears in the Declaration as expressing mutual obligations and duties to both parties to the contract.

If the government should fail to protect these rights, its citizens would have the right to overthrow that government.

The way that Jefferson used the concept of citizen sovereignty implies a certain type of social reciprocity based upon the duty to reciprocate.

Jefferson emphasized this reciprocity in his writings about the civil foundations of the new nation:

“What is here a right towards men is a duty towards the Creator. It is the duty of every man to render to the Creator such homage and such only as he believes to be acceptable to him. This duty is precedent, both in order of time and in degree of obligation, to the claims of Civil Society.”

In other words, Jefferson’s use of the term “consent” is connected to citizen sovereignty, natural rights, equality, and self-government, all of which are based upon the social obligation of the parties to the constitutional contract to reciprocate in obeying the rule of law.

Jefferson’s main principle of consent is that those bound most tightly by collective rules must be given the greatest say in the making and enforcing of the rules.

Self-government, according to Jefferson, meant allowing citizens a sphere of sovereignty that could not be disrupted by the central government (that which governs the best, governs the least).

The promise of liberty in America is that each individual is endowed with an equal right (opportunity) to access upward occupational and social mobility (flourishing).

In his chronology of events creating a new government, based upon consent, Jefferson identified four essential steps:

  • First, Jefferson believed that he and the other delegates to the Continental Congress, were, self-consciously, making a natural rights constitution.
  • Second, he believed that the constitution would be ratified by a majority vote of the people, (original consent).
  • Third, Jefferson assumed that the citizens in their state legislatures had the right to propose amendments to the constitution.
  • Fourth, he assumed that everyone understood what on-going consent meant. He wrote that on-going consent meant a frequent recurring vote in public elections, upholding the constitution and basic principles of natural rights, (rule of law), and the ultimate, sovereign authority of citizens to influence public policy, once the new government began operation.

The adoption of the Declaration, in 1776, and the subsequent adoption Articles, in 1781, moved the citizens of the United States toward a constitutional egalitarian individualism, with an appeal to natural rights.

We are in agreement with a passage from Gordon Wood’s book, The Radicalism of the American Revolution.

Wood wrote,

“To be an American could not be a matter of blood; it had to be a matter of common belief and behavior. And the source of that common belief and behavior was the American Revolution: it was the revolution and only the Revolution that made them one people.”

The point Wood is making is that the first American Revolution forged a common set of national cultural and social values that bound all citizens together into a shared national mission of liberty.

  1. Bradley Thompson, in his book, America’s Revolutionary Mind, describes the constellation of common beliefs of the Revolution, as the “American Moral Philosophy,” and cites Locke’s admonition that citizens who adhere to the American civic virtue do not undermine the liberty of other citizens.

Thompson wrote,

“Locke’s fundamental law of nature (i.e., to follow right reason) issues two commands: first, each and, every man should pursue his rational, long-term self-interest; and, second, “No one ought to harm another in his life, health, liberty, or possessions.”

No common set of cultural or social values currently bind the socialists into a common mission of liberty. The nation is evenly divided between citizens who desire socialism and citizens who desire freedom, and those two conceptions of America are incompatible and irreconcilable.

In the election of 2020, in order to impose socialism, the socialists transgressed Locke’s second law of nature in the code of American Civic Virtue by taking away citizen’s rights to vote, and the socialists, have, therefore, abrogated their claim of American citizenship.

Jefferson sought to keep a moral society separate and apart from government power.

In subverting the election laws, the socialists seek to subordinate all of society under the jurisdiction of a totalitarian government.

Locke sees individual citizens as owners of their own labor.

Socialists see citizens as property of the Socialist State.

Locke sees each individual as a moral agent, able to reason, and entitled to freedom. Locke states that the moral system is based upon individualism.

Daniel Webster stated,

“Our system begins with the individual man. The public happiness is to be the aggregate of the happiness of individuals.”

Socialists seek to substitute Marxist ideology of class conflict for Locke’s reason and replace individual reason with a totalitarian obedience to the Socialist State, where citizens have no capacity for individual reason.

Locke wrote that the single most important duty of government is to protect the God-given natural rights of their citizens. Locke stated that citizens possess a moral right to revolt when government violates those natural rights for the protection of which it was created.

In return for security, Locke expected those citizens to follow the legal laws enacted by the government to translate the consent of the governed into elected representatives.

Trump voters expected socialists to follow the legal laws of the code of American civic virtue of playing by the rules, established by common moral understanding of American values, and the socialists failed to follow the laws.

We cite Jefferson’s Declaration of Independence as the justification of a second American Revolution to restore the moral philosophy of the shared national mission of liberty, obtained in the first revolution.

We incorporate Jefferson’s principles of government into the Constitution of the Democratic Republic of America.

Section 3. The Articles of Confederation: America’s Third Founding Document.

In the example of the first American Revolution, the patriots replaced the insipient slavery of the British monarchy with a decentralized state-sovereignty representative republic, under the authority of the Articles of Confederation.

In translating Jefferson’s moral values into the Articles, Thomas Burke, the author of the Articles, aimed at resolving six issues.

Burke proposed:

  • that all sovereign power was in the states separately.
  • that the federal government held “expressly” enumerated powers…that each state retains its sovereignty, freedom and independence.
  • that any right which is not by this confederation “expressly” delegated to the United States in Congress assembled is retained by the states.
  • Congress is to be made up of two bodies of delegates, the General Council, and Council of State, with one delegate from each state.
  • All bills originate in the General Council, and are read 3 times and passed by a majority in the Council of State.
  • Every law must be demonstrated to be within the powers “expressly delegated to Congress.”

Thomas Paine wrote, in Common Sense, “let us hold out the hearty hand of friendship…an open and resolute friend, and a virtuous supporter of rights of mankind and of free and independent states of America,” in a non-coercive constitution, with the coercive police powers of the state.”

The phrase “mutual friendship” is lifted directly from Paine, and placed, by Thomas Burke, in the Preamble of the Articles, as the basis of the new government.  Burke’s intent in his Articles, was “to secure and perpetuate mutual friendship and intercourse among the people of the different States in this union.”

The Articles declare the purpose of the confederation:

“States hereby severally to enter into a firm league of friendship with each other, for their common defense, the security of their liberties, and their mutual and general welfare, binding themselves to assist each other, against all force offered to, or attacks made upon them, or any of them, on account of religion, sovereignty, trade, or any other pretense whatever.”

The Articles placed the new constitution within the context of the philosophy of the Declaration so that the words of the text could be interpreted from the historical context of a strict constructionist perspective.

The words of the Articles meant as the writers of the Articles used them, as they existed in 1776, as connected in time to the text of the Declaration.

Section 4. The Principles and Philosophy of Government of the Democratic Republic of America.

The allegiance to the rule of law in a natural rights republic is rooted in shared cultural customs and traditions of family, church, and community. The bonds of loyalty between citizens are strengthened when citizens join each other in common endeavors, like membership in a church.

As the shared cultural values are strengthened, voluntary obedience to the rule of law increases.

The civic associations, trade guilds, churches, and professional groups in America all have articles of incorporation and by-laws based upon ethical codes of behavior for their members.

These type of ethical codes and moral values are the same that undergird voluntary obedience to the rule of law when citizens form their new government, and leave the state of nature.

It is an easy transition for citizens to apply their lessons and experience in managing their civic and community clubs to managing their affairs in government. The local community and civic groups provided the bonds of affiliation with other citizens.

The shared cultural values of natural rights is the basis of the natural rights constitution. Equality in natural rights leads to a constitution based upon majority rule.

Majority rule is the means to implement a government based upon the principle of equal rights of all, and special privileges for none.

Allegiance to the rule of law is promoted by citizens who have consented to make decisions by majority rule in their constitution.

Jefferson called this idea “self-government.”

In the Democratic Republic of America, political parties act as the mediating forum in the relationship between individual citizens, and the institutional structure of government.

The political parties act as the mechanism through which cultural values are transmitted to elected representatives into laws and rules.

The parties represent the connection between the practical knowledge of how government works and the cultural values of society. The parties answer Centinel’s question about the obvious flaw in Madison’s constitution about translating the will of the citizens into law.

In other words, there exists a public purpose in a having a fair political process, wherein citizens meet to make informed decisions, that is independent of the partisan fortunes of any particular political party or elected official.

The translation of the will of the citizens into laws, through voting on representatives, requires the police protection of the state to insure the integrity of the process.

How votes are cast and counted, and how votes are authenticated is too important a civic function to leave to the private special interests of partisan parties, as it currently exists today, in the swamp.

The mechanics of the voting process would be separated from the partisan interests of political parties in determining the outcome of the voting. The institution of government is conceived as a generic extension of the will of the citizens, and not as an independent arbitrator of special interest greed.

The constitutional framework of the Democratic Republic of America returns government to Jefferson’s principles of “self-government,” based upon the political equality of all citizens.

We provide 3 sections of the new Constitution of the Democratic Republic of America.

The first section is incorporated as the Preamble of the Constitution of the Democratic Republic of America.

Principles of government.

  1. “…that all legitimate authority is derived from the consent of the governed, and that the further removed authority becomes from the consent of the governed the more likely the authority is illegitimate, oppressive and corrupt.
  2. “…that those governed by the laws and whose individual freedom is restricted by the laws should have the greatest say and consent in making of the laws.”
  3. “…that those who make the laws and give consent to the laws, acting as representatives of the citizens, bind themselves and their constituents to following the laws.”
  4. “…that which governs the best, governs the least and closest to the people who are subject to the authority of the government.”
  5. “…that governments are instituted among humans to further individual freedom to pursue individual happiness and to limit the arbitrary application of power over the lives of individuals.”
  6. “…that individual citizens who freely give their consent to form a government through constitutional conventions are bound by the original contract until the operation of the government becomes destructive to the original intent of obtaining individual freedom and the pursuit of happiness.”
  7. “…that the citizens have mechanisms in place in the original constitutional contract to modify or abolish the governments that have been created that are now destructive to the ideals and goals under which the governments were instituted.”
  8. “…that the parties to the constitutional contract are individual citizens acting under individual sovereignty granted to them by God.”
  9. “…that individual citizens may form different units of levels of government, but that local, state and national governments as synthetic corporate creations never usurp the sovereign power or authority of the individual citizens.”
  10. “…that an individual’s private property obtained through legal contract and title transfer, their rights to appropriate income and profits from the use of their private property, and their rights to dispose and transfer their private property are inviolate and derived from natural rights granted to them by God, and that no government or constitutional contract may ever abrogate or subordinate these natural individual rights.
  11. “…that the American experiment of representative democracy was ordained by God to pursue individual human freedoms and liberty from oppression and is an exceptional model in human history to be preserved, protected, and cherished by the citizens and deployed by them and their elected representatives as the guiding principles in America’s relationships with other nations and other people.

Section 5. The Declaration of Citizen Rights of the Democratic Republic of America.

The outline of the Declaration of Rights for the Democratic Republic of America follows the Virginia Declaration of Rights, written by George Mason, and adopted by the Virginia Constitutional Convention on June 12, 1776.

Citizen Declaration of Rights of the Democratic Republic of America.

We affirm and swear that all citizens in each of the respective Democratic Republic of America are guaranteed equal rights for all, and special privileges for none. Among them are:

  1. That all citizens are due the equal application of justice and that no citizen is entitled to special or unequal treatment of the application of the law.
  2. That all citizens have a natural right to worship and exercise their own religion and that the National Government is prohibited from making and enforcing any law respecting the establishment of an official national religion and compelling citizens to worship a national religion.
  3. That all citizens have a natural right to truthful and honest statements from government agents and from elected representatives, and that it is the duty of the free press to report the truth.
  4. That all citizens in the respective states have a natural right to own and use weapons, and that the National Government shall make no laws which abridge the right of law-abiding citizens from owning, keeping and bearing weapons.
  5. That citizens have a civil right of action against elected representatives or agents of the National Government, for violation of the natural rights of citizens, upon a presentation of a motion of grievance to a Grand Jury of 18 citizens, who shall hear the case and determine the outcome and set the penalties for the violation by a majority vote.
  6. No citizen in any state shall be seized or imprisoned, or stripped of his rights or possessions, or outlawed or exiled, or deprived of his standing in any other way, nor shall agents of the government proceed with force against him, or send others to do so, except by the lawful judgment of a true bill of indictment by a majority vote of a grand jury of 18 citizens, or by the rules of judicial civil procedure of the National Government.
  7. The National Government shall be prohibited from making or enforcing any law that restricts the natural right of a citizen’s freedom of speech and freedom of conscience.
  8. The National Government is prohibited from making or enforcing any law which restricts the right of citizens to peaceably assemble, and to petition the National Government for a redress of grievances.
  9. The National Government is prohibited from using agents of government or national resources to conduct searches and seizures of private citizen documents, and that the documents obtained from illegal searches and seizures are inadmissible in any national court.
  10. The National Government, and every State government, are prohibited from making or enforcing any law which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens of the Democratic Republic of America; nor shall any State deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws.
  11. No citizen shall be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor shall private property be taken for public use, without just compensation, determined by a majority vote of a Grand Jury of 18 citizens.
  12. That all citizens are judged innocent until proven guilty in a trial of due process.
  13. No warrants or judicial orders in any criminal investigation shall be issued by a national court, except upon probable cause, determined in a judicial hearing, supported by an oath or affirmation of the government agent describing the specific items or locations to be searched and a judicial description of the crime being investigated.
  14. No person shall be held to answer for a capital, or otherwise infamous crime, unless on a presentment or indictment of a majority vote of a Grand Jury of 18 citizens who conduct an inquiry into the legitimacy of the government’s allegation of a national crime.
  15. No citizen shall be subject for the same offence to be twice put in jeopardy of life or limb; nor shall be compelled in any criminal case to be a witness against himself.
  16. In all criminal prosecutions, the accused shall enjoy the right to a speedy and public trial, by an impartial jury of the State and district wherein the crime shall have been committed, which district shall have been previously ascertained by law, and to be informed of the nature and cause of the accusation; to be confronted with the witnesses against him; to have compulsory process for obtaining witnesses in his favor, and to have the assistance of counsel for his defense.
  17. The right of trial by jury shall be preserved, and no fact tried by a jury, shall be otherwise re-examined in any Court of the Democratic Republic of America, than according to the rules of the common law then obtaining in the national judiciary.
  18. Excessive bail shall not be required, nor excessive fines imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted, nor imprisonment for longer than 5 days, in the absence of specific charges and allegation of crime.
  19. The Citizens Grand Jury in any State retains the right of initiating a citizen initiative on legislative proposals by a petition to the House of Representatives, which must respond to the petition within 30 days of receipt.
  20. The right of citizens of the Democratic Republic of America to vote, hold elected office, or deliberate in public debates, shall not be denied or abridged by the National Government or by any State on account of race, color of skin, sex, or religious beliefs.

Section 6. The Constitution of the Democratic Republic of America.

The new Constitution aims at protecting citizen liberty by stating that the public purpose in a having a fair political process, wherein citizens meet to make informed decisions, that is independent of the partisan fortunes of any particular political party or elected official.

The translation of the will of the citizens into laws, through voting on representatives, requires the police protection of the state to insure the integrity of the process.

How votes are cast and counted, and how votes are authenticated is too important a civic function to leave to the private special interests of partisan parties, as it currently exists today, in the swamp.

The mechanics of the voting process would be separated from the partisan interests of political parties in determining the outcome of the voting. The institution of government is conceived as a generic extension of the will of the citizens, and not as an independent arbitrator of special interest greed.

The constitutional framework of the Democratic Republic of America returns government to Jefferson’s principles of “self-government,” based upon the political equality of all citizens.

The Democratic Republic Constitution strictly limits the domain of government power from infringing on the freedom and liberty of citizens to re-establish the primacy of civic associations, expressed in Jefferson’s Declaration.

Elections and the regulation of political parties in the Democratic Republic of America is based upon 4 fundamental principles of fair rules:

  • Fair Rules for National Elections.
  • Fair Rules on the Function and Authority of the National Government.
  • Fair Rules for Political Parties.
  • Fair and Competitive Elections

Fair Rules for Federal Elections.

The Constitution establishes procedures for voter qualifications and voting procedures, in national elections.

The Constitution requires elected representatives to swear an oath of allegiance to defend the constitution and the rights of citizens, as expressed in the Declaration of Independence.

Fair Rules on the Function and Authority of the National Government.

The Constitution establishes term limits of all elected representatives.

Senators serve four year terms and may succeed in office once, and no more than 10 years in a lifetime.

All House of Representatives serve two year terms, and no more than 4 terms total and no more than 10 years in a lifetime.

The Constitution of the Democratic Republic of America returns to the rule of electing one U. S. Senator, per state, whose constitutional mission is to protect the interests of citizens in their states from the threat of tyranny of the central government.

The Constitution establishes term limits of 10 years for all government employees and congressional staff.

The Constitution establishes a bright line rule for impeachment of elected federalist representatives, or appointed officials, initiated by either the national government, or in the legislatures of the states.

The Constitution establishes restrictions of the domain of power of the National Bank and national treasury to policies which inure to the exclusive benefit of U. S. citizens and to the benefit of the sovereign U. S. domestic economy.

Constitutional limits on the issuance of national debt and a constitutional requirement that the U. S. Department of the Treasury limit the national debt ceiling to a target debt level in any 10 year period, by approval of a majority of state legislatures.

The Constitution limits the National Congress to laws  “expressly” enumerated in the Constitution that defend natural rights from the non-elected agents of government.

The Constitution requires that each law passed by the National Congress contain a preamble that justifies the enactment as necessary and proper to the defense of natural rights and the sovereignty of the Nation.

The Constitution mandates that before any law be made for raising taxes, the purpose for which any tax is to be raised will appear clearly to the preamble of the legislation stating the constitutional integrity of the tax.

For example, any revenue or tax bill would contain a preamble as styled:

“That the people have a right to uniform government; and, therefore, that no bill or tax whose interests are outside the sovereign interests of the United States, or separate from, or independent of the government of the United States, ought to be enacted.”

Fair Rules for Political Parties.

The Constitution establishes the right of citizens in each state to recall nationally elected representatives by vote of the registered members of the parties that elected the elected representative.

The Constitution sets time limits between campaign announcements and elections. Parties select candidates for office in August for national election held in last weekend of October.

Voter ID cards are issued by the state Secretary of States. ID cards, along with other identification must be presented by a voter, at the voting booth.

Candidates running for office must clearly state in all public announcements their party affiliation, and that if elected, they will support their party platform.

Six weeks before a national election, a political party must publish their party platform and state how the platform supports the Res Publica of natural rights.

Fair and Competitive Elections.

The Constitution establishes House election districts by quantitative criteria, for periods of 10 years.

The Constitution delegates power to each State Secretary of State the authority to form state election commissions to oversee integrity of voter registration and voting process in each federalist election

Candidates for each party swear and affirm an oath to defend the stated principles of the party, if elected.

Political parties are registered by State Secretary of State, as non-profit corporations.

New political parties are certified by State Secretary of State by valid petition signed by registered members of the party equal to 10% of all registered voters in the state.

Parties are de-certified by Secretary of State in any national presidential election where the total votes cast by registered members for President is less than 10%.

Secretary of State issues voter ID card for all non-affiliated registered voters.

Multiple political parties compete for votes, and the party obtaining the plurality gets to form the new government. 

The Constitution of the Democratic Republic of America.

Preamble:

We, the citizens of the Democratic Republic of America, establish  this constitutional contract between our respective states and the National Government of the Democratic Republic of America.

We solemnly swear and affirm that we establish this contract to preserve and protect the natural and civil rights of citizens in each state, and to protect and defend the sovereignty of each state and the nation, from foreign and domestic threats.

The Principles of Government would be inserted here.

After the Principles of Government, the Declaration of Citizen Rights would be inserted.

After the Declaration of Rights, the main text of the Constituion would be presented.

Article I. The National Congress.

Section 1.

All legitimate authority of the National Government and the expression of the consent of the governed, is vested in the National Congress of the Democratic Republic of America, which shall consist of a Senate and House of Representatives.

No elected representative of the National Government may serve more than two consecutive terms, in the same office, nor more than 10 years in the same office, in a lifetime.

No law varying the compensation for the services of the Senators and Representatives shall take effect during an interval of 10 years.

All elected representatives of the National Government and all senior civil servants and agents are subject to the same laws and welfare benefits as common citizens who are bound by the laws made by the National Government.

Section 2. The Authority of the House of Representatives.

The House of Representatives shall represent the interests and rights of citizens in each state.

The elected representatives are chosen every fourth year by the verified citizens of the several States.

No elected representative may serve more than two terms in the same office, nor more than 10 years in the same office, during a lifetime.

No person shall be a representative who shall not have attained  the age of twenty one, and shall have been a citizen of the Democratic Republic of America, for the previous 10 years, and who shall have been a resident of that State for the previous 10 years.

Each state shall have at least one representative. The total number of

representatives shall not exceed one for every fifty thousand verified citizens.

The members of the House shall prepare the districts for representation based

upon the criteria of compact geographical rectangular shapes, every 10 years,

based upon a census and enumeration of citizens in each state.

Direct Taxes shall be apportioned among the several States according to their respective numbers of verified citizens. The House of Representatives sets the tax rate, pursuant to the budget transmitted to the House from the Senate.

The House has the exclusive power to charter and regulate a system of national banks designed to promote interstate and international commerce and maximum rates of economic growth among all states.

The House imposes restrictions on the domain of power and authority of the system of national banks, and restricts the domain of the bank’s authority to promote the economic welfare of sovereign Democratic Republic States and sovereign citizens.

The House has the exclusive authority to regulate the issuance of charters for interstate and international commerce. The House may impose restrictions, sanctions and revocations of charters for trade practices that are contrary to the sovereignty and welfare of citizens or the states.

Section 3.

  1. Vacancies in the House of Representatives from any State, shall be filled by an election of the citizens to be held within 4 weeks of the vacancy.
  2. The House of Representatives shall choose their own rules of civil procedure and elect their own executive officers every 2 years.

Section 4.

  1. 1. The House of Representatives shall have the sole power of initiating an impeachment of any elected representative or senior executive of the National Government whose position was filled by Congressional approval.
  1. Upon a petition of 50% of the elected representatives, the House may convene  a committee of impeachment to consider a true bill of indictment. The true bill  must state the national felony committed and be ratified by 60% of the total  number of representatives.

Section 5. The Authority of the National Senate.

The Senate of the Democratic Republic of America shall be composed of one Senator elected from each state.

The Senators represent the collective corporate interests of the state.

The Senators are chosen every fourth year by the people of the several states.

No elected Senator may serve more than two terms in the same office, nor more than 10 years in the same office, during a lifetime.

No citizen shall be a Senator who shall not have attained to the age of twenty one, and shall have been a citizen of the Democratic Republic of America, for the previous 10 years, and who shall have been a resident of that state for the previous 10 years.

The Senate shall chose their own rules of civil procedure, and elect their other officers every two years.

Vacancies in the Senate from any state, shall be filled by an election of the citizens to be held within 4 weeks of the vacancy.

The Senate shall have the sole power to try all true bills of impeachment, transmitted to the Senate from the House of Representatives.

The true bill of impeachment must state the national crime committed by the accused, including the crime of treason and the crime of espionage against private citizens of the Democratic Republic of America.

A conviction of the accused by two-thirds of the Senate shall result in immediate removal of the officer from office, with a forfeiture of all accrued and future benefits of the office.

Section 6. National Congressional Elections.

The times, places and manner of holding elections for Senators and Representatives, shall be prescribed in each state by the legislature thereof, according to the results of the enumeration of verified citizens in each state, every five years, conducted by the House of Representatives. The state legislature has authority to determine the verification of the qualification of a citizen to vote.

Section 7. Voting.

The members of the House and Senate shall be the judge of the legitimacy of elections, returns and qualifications of its own members.

Upon a petition from any member, or upon a petition from a citizens Grand Jury, the members of the House and Senate shall punish and remove a member for disorderly conduct upon a conviction vote of 60% of the members of the respective House or Senate.

The deliberations of both houses are open public records and procedures, to be broadcast or transmitted to the public on a frequent, periodic basis.

Neither House, during the session of the National Congress, shall, without the consent of the other, adjourn for more than three days. A session of Congress begins on January 21, of each year, adjourns for the month of August, and resumes the first Monday in September, and is in session until December 20, of each year.

Section 8. Compensation.

The Senators and Representatives shall receive compensation for their services, to be ascertained every 10 years, and confirmed by a majority vote of a Grand Jury of 18 citizens, impaneled in the election district of the representative.

No Senator or Representative shall, during the time for which he was elected, be appointed to any civil office of the Democratic Republic of America, nor be entitled to any civil emoluments, and no person holding any civil office in the Democratic Republic of America, shall be an elected member of either House during his term of civil service, nor shall he be a candidate for any office, during his term of civil service.

No Senator or Representative may be appointed to serve as an employee of the National Government for a period of 3 years, after the term of office ends.

Section 9. National Budget and Money.

The National Congress will operate the Democratic Republic of America according to a balanced budget, during a budget cycle of two years, where the expenditures of the Government do not exceed the tax revenues set to meet those expenditures.

The National Government budget, and all bills for raising revenue, shall originate in the Senate, to be completed no later than the day before the August adjournment.

Every budget bill which shall have passed the Senate shall be transmitted to the House. The House must vote on the proposed budget of the Senate by November 30, of each year, or the national budget will revert to the same budget as the previous 2 years.

A budget passed by the House, and the proposed rate of taxes to meet the budget, must be presented to the President of the Democratic Republic of America on December 1, to approve or reject, by December 20 of each year. Upon a rejection by the President, the budget reverts to the same budget as the previous 2 years.

The National Congress shall have power to lay and collect taxes, duties, imposts and excises, to meet the expenditures of the 2 year balanced budget. All duties, imposts and excises shall be uniform throughout the Democratic Republic of America.

No tax or duty shall be laid on articles exported from any state to another state.

No State shall enter into any trade treaty, or trade alliance with a foreign nation.

The National Congress shall have the power to issue government bonds, and to borrow money on the credit of the Democratic Republic of America. All proposals to borrow money or issue debt shall occur once in the two year budget cycle, and all proposals to issue debt must be approved by 50% of the State legislatures of the Democratic Republic of America, no later than January 21 of the year of issuance.

The term of debt and interest on any issuance of debt shall not exceed 10 years, and must be paid in full by the end of the 10th year. The National Congress shall have the power to regulate commerce and approve trade agreements with foreign nations, which are negotiated by the President.

The National Congress shall have the power to establish a uniform rule of citizen naturalization, and provide revenues for national border security to prohibit illegal entrance into the sovereign nation or any sovereign state.

The National Congress shall have the power to coin money, regulate the value thereof, regulate the circulation and creation of money and money instruments, regulate the national banking system and establish the currency value of foreign coin, and fix the Standard of Weights and Measures.

The National Congress shall have the power to provide for the punishment for the national criminal felony of counterfeiting the securities and money of the Democratic Republic of America.

The National Congress shall have the power to establish a national Post Office and a national system of roads and transportation routes.

The National Congress shall have the power to authorize regional capital securities markets, and to establish regulatory guidelines for the operation of regional private and public security exchanges designed to promote maximum national and regional economic growth rates.

The National Congress shall have the power to establish and maintain a national patent office to promote the progress of science and useful arts, by securing for limited times to authors and inventors the exclusive right to their respective writings and discoveries.

The National Congress shall have the power to protect the patents of citizens from foreign and domestic criminal usurpation of the right of citizens to enjoy the benefits of their invention.

The National Congress shall have the power to define and punish intellectual property piracies and criminal patent felonies committed against citizens of the Democratic Republic of America by foreign and domestic criminals.

Upon a presentment of a declaration of war by the President, the National Congress shall have the power to declare war and authorize the application of military power and action against foreign enemies, within 2 days of receiving the President’s declaration. No military action undertaken by the President may continue after 48 hours, without the consent of the National Congress.

The National Congress shall have the power to raise and support the military and armed forces, to provide and maintain a Navy, and to arm and provide a Coast Guard to protect and preserve the sovereign borders of the Democratic Republic of America.

The National Congress shall have the power to provide for organizing, and arming, the National Guard, and reserving to the states respectively, the appointment of the officers, and the authority of training the National Guard, according to the rules and laws prescribed by the National Congress.

The National Congress shall have the power to make all laws which shall be necessary and proper for carrying into execution the foregoing military powers.

The President shall be the Supreme Commander in Chief of all military personnel and resources.

The National Congress shall have the power to protect the citizen’s right of the Writ of Habeas Corpus, which shall not be suspended, unless in case of invasion, when the public safety may require it.

The National Congress is prohibited from passing or enforcing any bill of attainder or ex post facto law.

The National Congress shall have Power to dispose of and make all needful rules and regulations respecting the territory or other property belonging to the Democratic Republic of America; and nothing in this Constitution shall be so construed as to prejudice any claims of the Democratic Republic States, or of any particular state.

Article II. The Office of President.

Section 1. Term Limits and Election.

The executive power of the National Government shall be vested in a President of the Democratic Republic of America. He shall hold his office for a term of four years, and, may serve a second term, if elected.

It is the constitutional duty of the President to preserve, protect and defend the natural and civil rights of citizens and to defend the sovereign borders of the nation from foreign and domestic threats.

No President may serve more than two terms, and no more than 10 years during a lifetime.

No Person except a natural born citizen, or a verified Citizen of the Democratic Republic of America for the previous 10 years, shall be eligible for election of President; The President must be at least 35 years of age on the date of assuming office.

The President selects the candidate of Vice President, no later than August 1, of the year of the Presidential election.

The national election for President is held during the two days of the first weekend in November.

The presidential candidate with a majority of electoral college votes is declared the winner, by the House of Representatives, no later than November 15 of the year of the election. The number of electors for each State is equal to the whole number of Senators and Representatives to which the State may be entitled in the Congress.

The Electors shall meet in their respective States, and are legally obligated to vote according to the popular vote of the citizens.

The term of office for the President begins December 1 of the year of the election.

Before he enters office on December 1, the President must recite, in a public ceremony, administered by the House of Representatives, the opening Paragraphs of the Declaration of Independence:

When in the Course of human events it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another and to assume among the powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to which the Laws of Nature and of Nature’s God entitle them, a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel them to the separation.

I hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness. — That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed, — That whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new Government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their Safety and Happiness.

Upon the conclusion of reciting the Declaration, The President swears the following oath of office:

I do solemnly swear that I will faithfully execute the Office of President of the Democratic Republic of America, according to the principles of government stated in the Constitution of the Democratic Republic of America.

I solemnly swear to preserve, protect and defend the natural and civil rights of citizens and to defend the sovereign borders of the nation from foreign and domestic threats.

So Help me, God.

Section 2. Removal.

In case of the removal of the President from Office, or of his death, resignation, impeachment, or inability to discharge the powers and duties of the Office, the Vice President assumes the office of President, no later than 24 hours after the removal of the President.

The House of Representatives, by law, may provide for the designation of an  interim President, in the event that both the President and Vice President are not able to serve the Office. Within 24 hours of appointing an interim President, the House of  Representatives shall set the time and conditions of the election of a new  President, by a vote of valid citizens in each state, to be held within 30 days of the appointment of the interim President.

Section 3. General Powers and Authority.

The President shall be the Supreme Commander in Chief of the Army and

Navy of the Democratic Republic States, and of the National Guard of the several States, when called into the actual service of the Democratic Republic States; he may require the  opinion, in writing, of the principal officer in each of the military departments, upon any subject relating to the duties of their respective offices.

The President shall have power to grant reprieves and pardons for offences against the Democratic Republic of America, except in cases of impeachment of any national official.

The President shall have power, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, to make treaties, provided two thirds of the Senators present concur; and he shall nominate, and by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, appoint ambassadors, other public ministers and consuls, and all other Executive Officers of the Democratic Republic of America, whose appointments are not herein otherwise provided for, and which shall be established by law: but the Congress may by law vest the appointment of such inferior officers, as they think proper, in the President alone, in the executive officers of the executive departments.

The President shall have the power to fill all executive vacancies that may  happen during the recess of the National Congress, by granting commissions which shall expire at the resumption of the session of the National Congress.

He shall, on January 21 of each year, present to the National Congress, the State of the Union, and recommend to their consideration such measures as he shall judge necessary and expedient for the next two years, including his proposal for the two year budget of the Democratic Republic of America.

The President, Vice President and all civil officers whose appointment to office is confirmed by the National Congress, shall be subject to impeachment for treason against the sovereign interests of the nation or the sovereign interests of the states, espionage against verified citizens, bribery by a foreign government, or other national felony.

Article III. The National Judicial Courts.

Section 1. National Court System.

The national judicial courts shall consist of National District Courts and the National Supreme Court.

The Senate ordains and establishes National District Courts in each state, and provides the two year operating budget for each District Court, every two years.

All judges shall hold a term of office for six years, and may serve one additional term, if approved by the Senate.

No judge may serve more than two terms in a single court system, nor more than 18 years in both courts, in a lifetime.

Vacancies on either the District of Supreme Court are filled by nominations by the Senate, and confirmed by a majority vote of the House of Representatives. The Senate is obligated to nominate judges within 7 days of a vacancy, and the House must confirm or reject the nomination within 7 days of obtaining the nomination from the Senate.

Section 2. National District Courts.

The judicial power of the District and Supreme Court extends to cases arising under the Constitution of the Democratic Republic of America.

The District Court is a trier of facts in criminal and civil cases arising under this Constitution.

In all cases arising in the District Court, the principles of justice are the equal application of the law to all citizens and substantive due process.

The trial of all national crimes shall be by jury, upon a presentment of a true bill of indictment to the District Court, by a majority vote of an impaneled Grand Jury of 18 citizens, in the state where the alleged crime occurred.

A person charged in any state with treason, a national felony, or any other crime against a Congressional law, who shall flee from justice, and be found in another state or foreign nation, shall on demand of the judicial authority of the National District Court, be delivered to the state having jurisdiction of the crime.

The District Court tries cases of treason of citizens against the Democratic Republic of America, or against any Liberty State.

The National Congress shall have the power to declare the punishment of treason, including the penalty of death.

Appeals of judicial decisions from the District to the Supreme Court must state the specific text of the Constitution that is being appealed. A majority of the Supreme Court may agree to hear an appeal.

A decision by the Supreme Court becomes the supreme law of the land for issues pertaining exclusively to the Constitution of the Democratic Republic of America.

This Constitution, and the laws made by the National Congress, or which shall be made, under the Authority of the Democratic Republic States, shall be the supreme Law of the Land for laws and cases exclusively pertaining to the National Government.

Full Faith and Credit shall be given in each state to the public acts, records, and judicial proceedings of every other state. And the Senate of the National Congress may by general laws prescribe the manner in which such acts, records and proceedings shall be proved, and the effect thereof.

Section 3. Citizen Grand Jury.

The Chief District Judge manages and administers the Citizen Grand Juries in each district, provides for their operating budget, impanels them and instructs the members that their mission is to serve as a barrier to oppression and tyranny.

Section 4. Qualifications.

All national court judges must be at least 45 years of age, and have been a practicing, licensed attorney at the state or national level, for a period of 20 years, prior to the nomination to the Court.

The mandatory retirement age of all National judges is 70 years of age.

Article IV. Admission of New States and Removal of States From the Union.

Upon a petition for admission from a state legislature, new states may be admitted by the Senate into this Union.

The Senate may determine the geographical area and jurisdiction of a new State, including partial jurisdictions of states not currently a member of this Union.

Verified citizens of a partial jurisdiction in any state not in the Union may petition the Senate based upon a certified referendum of 66% of the citizens in the proposed jurisdiction.

Prior to their admission to the Union, as a condition of admission, the state or partial jurisdiction, seeking admission must deposit a full year of their projected taxes into the National Treasury, as determined by the Senate.

Upon a resolution presented by a Senator of any state, the national Congress may consider the removal of an existing state member of the Union.

The grounds for removal are failure to abide by the rules of this Constitution.

A vote of 2/3 of the representatives of all states is sufficient for permanent removal from the Union, effective immediately upon the vote.

Any state may secede from this Union by a petition ratified by a majority of the state legislature, presented to the National Senate.

The Senate must act upon the petition to grant secession within 14 days.

The grant of secession is irrevocable and permanent.

Notwithstanding the permanency of secession of a state, verified citizens of a partial geographical territory of the former state may petition the Senate for admission as a new state.

A citizen of the Democratic Republic of America may emigrate to a non-member territory or state by a petition of citizenship revocation.

A citizen revocation of citizenship is irrevocable and permanent.

Article V. Amendments.

Upon a petition from any state legislature to the Senate, a resolution for amendment of this Constitution may be considered by both houses of the National Congress.

The resolution must be voted upon within 14 days of submission to the National Congress.

A vote of 2/3 of the representatives of both houses, from all states, enacts the amendment, which becomes effective immediately.

A failed resolution of the amendment may not be reconsidered by the National  Congress for a period of 5 years after the date of the vote.

Conclusion: Ratification and Implementation.

As we have noted elsewhere, we believe that the only peaceful, non-violent resolution of the irreconcilable ideological differences between Marxist Democrats and natural rights conservatives is a civil dissolution of the former United States of America.

We propose that each state legislature implement a constitutional review committee to debate the adoption of this proposed Constitution.

Upon a majority vote of the legislature to approve the Constitution, the proposed constitution would be placed before the citizens for a referendum.

The citizens ballot would contain 3 options:

  1. Join the new nation of the Democratic Republic of America.
  2. Join a proposed new socialist nation that socialist states would create.
  3. Stay as a member state of the existing Former United States of America.

The option obtaining the majority of voters would be implemented by the state legislature.

We have created a discussion forum for natural rights conservatives to discuss this proposed constitution, at www.clpnewsnetwork.com

I am Laurie Thomas Vass, and this article is a copyrighted production of the Citiens Liberty Party News Network.